Spinoff Prize looks for Irish companies

14 June 2022

The Spinoff Prize rewards shortlisted spin-outs with profiles in Nature and a chance to win the top prize.

Academic publishing company Springer Nature is looking for Irish research spin-outs to apply for its Spinoff Prize competition, which celebrates the best and brightest research-led companies.

The competition judges are looking for spin-outs that translate original scientific research into products and services that address market problems and are well positioned to make a positive impact on society.

Shortlisted companies will receive a profile in a special Nature supplement ahead of the final. These companies will then pitch their ideas to an expert panel at the 2023 Future Insight Days event. The overall winner will receive a cash prize of €30,000 to further develop their research.

This year, the Spinoff Prize is seeking entrants founded on research both life sciences and the physical sciences (physics, astronomy, chemistry and Earth science). Competitors are expected across digital technologies such as AI, deep learning, neuromorphic computing and quantum computing.

“Springer Nature’s Spinoff Prize is an excellent opportunity for Irish spin-outs to showcase their ideas and impact at a global scale,” said Imelda Lambkin, Enterprise Ireland’s lead on disruptive technologies, innovation and knowledge transfer.

“This year’s category is particularly interesting, with Ireland having a strong pedigree in the life and physical sciences disciplines. I would encourage any of our spin-outs in these sectors to enter the awards in what could be a transformative process for their growth,” she added.

Applications close on 29 July, and shortlisted companies will be announced in March 2023. The Future Insight Days event is scheduled for July that year.

The awards form part of the wider Nature Awards suite, which look to celebrate and champion scientific excellence globally. More information on The Spinoff Prize, including how to apply and the eligibility requirements can be found on the Nature website.

Source: siliconrepublic